REGIONAL

We deliver location specific courses in a variety of REGIONAL centres around the world in order to maximise the opportunity to interact and learn while minimising travelling expenses.

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Course Details
CourseDates 
Mine Sampling and Assay Data Quality (QAQC) Management14-17/5/19Enquire Now

Access to sampling and assay data of the highest integrity is key to evaluating and exploiting mineral resources and reserves.  The resource and reserve define the asset and companies rely on the quality and accuracy of the data used in processes, such as, resource and reserve estimates, classification of ore and waste, reconciliation of production to plan and mineral beneficiation.  Poorly defined procedures and actions have tremendous consequences.

To assist mine personnel maintain the integrity of the data, a robust QAQC system is a “must have” in any sampling/assaying programme and minimising the errors and faults that may occur throughout the stages of the assay process that eventuate in an assay value is essential.

Developed for geologists, mining engineers and metallurgists involved in maintaining and analysing sampling and quality control systems in mineral projects/operating mines, this course provides participants with an overview of sampling techniques, analytical methods used in the field or laboratory and quality control systems.  The intent is to help the participants understand the systems they work with.

Course Content

Sampling and Analytical Methods

  • Precision, accuracy & bias
  • Sampling Errors
  • Sample collection
  • Sample description
  • Sub-sampling & splitting
  • Laboratory Analytical Methods and Limits of Detection
  • Bulk Density determination

Quality Control Systems

  • Quality Control Concepts
  • Use of Standard Reference Materials as control points
  • Duplicates, Replicates and Referee Samples
  • Statistics and Control Charts
  • Setting up an appropriate Quality Control programme.
  • Reconciliation of assay results with sample descriptions
  • Commercial software vs Excel spreadsheets
Course Details
CourseDates 
Mine Grade Control and Reconciliation20-23/5/19Enquire Now

“Minimise Ore to Waste and Waste to Ore.”  It seems like an easy to understand statement, but it goes beyond unplanned loss or dilution.  Misclassification involves: sampling practices, level of unit selectivity for ore/waste definition, inappropriate selection/us of estimation parameters and poor mining practice.  It is no one thing, it is an accumulation of errors.

The Grade Control part of the course combines participants understanding methodologies to be used, with practical exercises based on best practice in grade control techniques to minimise misclassification of ore and waste.  The course covers: sampling for grade control models, a survey of currently used estimation methods, ore definition and ore boundary control and information management options.  The course will also look at why the grade control model and resource model are different.

Mine reconciliation is not accounting! The objective of mining reconciliation is not to get two sets of numbers to balance, which is often seen as an end in itself, by those focused on factors, but rather to help identify and understand the discrepancies that occur throughout the reconciliation process in order to assess and improve the processes involved.

This course presents participants with reconciliation as a quality control and oreflow management tool.  The course introduces the mining value chain, measurement points along the chain, reconciliation between points in the value chain and between periods in the Life-of-Mine.   Exercises provide examples of calculations in the reconciliation process.

Course Content

Grade Control Techniques & Modelling

  • The grade control process
  • Mapping and logging
  • Survey control
  • Grade control sampling and quality control systems
  • Trenching, core, RC samples and blasthole samples
  • Assaying and Bulk density
  • Grade control modelling
  • Costs and cut-off grades
  • Selectivity and Ore / waste definition
  • Dig plans
  • Mark outs
  • Blast movement
  • Stockpile management
  • Procedures and database management

Mine Reconciliation

  • Mining value chain
  • Reconciliation as a quality control tool.
  • Ore flows, risk assessment, sampling
  • Measurement points in the value chain, standard reconciliation nomenclature
  • Point to Point Reconciliation, geology, mine, plant, transport – data and calculations
  • Period on Period Reconciliation – data and calculations
  • Reconciliation systems and software tools for data management and analysis.
Course Details
CourseDates 
Mineral Resource Estimation (Theory and Practical)13-17/5/19Enquire Now

This course has been designed for geologists and mining engineers involved with or are interested in becoming involved with mineral resource estimation for prospect evaluation, grade control or long-term planning.  The course requires a knowledge of geology and/or mine planning but does not require prior knowledge of geostatistics.  Participants should have computer skills associated with geology modelling, grade control or mine planning software.

The course requires the use of Microsoft Excel and geostatistical modelling software to complete the practical portion. Participants can bring their own commercial software or use ours, which will be provided for practical exercises.

Course Content

  • Introduction to modelling and its purpose.
  • Role and responsibilities of the mineral resource modeller.
  • Exploratory Data Analysis – Data Quality, Geology and Descriptive Statistics
  • Modifying Data-Domaining, Top cutting and Compositing
  • Spatial Relationships and Variography
  • Estimation Methodologies (Nearest Neighbour, Inverse Distance and Linear Regression-Kriging)
  • Choosing Estimation Parameters-block sizes and search neighbourhoods
  • Estimation
  • Validation
  • Classification
  • Documentation
  • Workflows for various commercial software or GSLIB.
Course Details
CourseDates 
Optimal Open Pit Blasting Techniques
Metal, Coal and Quarry Operations
Enquire Now

This course introduces mine personnel involved in the blasting process to the latest techniques and methods.  The course will focus on Blast Optimisation thereby ensuring downstream benefits through improved drilling and blasting operations.  The course focuses on the generic details of blasting products with no particular emphasis on specific manufacturers and their products, thereby ensuring impartiality.

Opportunities will be given for delegates to introduce the course attendees to their individual technical challenges at their mine site for discussion, with a collective review of their existing blasting techniques and procedures part of the course.

The course will cover the following:

Understanding the basics

  • Understanding your Current designs
  • Major factors influencing blast efficiency
  • Rock fragmentation by blasting
  • Three keys to improving explosive performance
  • Geological effects on blast performance
  • Defining blast performance goals and developing designs
  • Selecting the best explosive for site conditions
  • Initiation Systems
  • Drilling your Blastholes
  • Geological Considerations
  • Fragmentation Optimization
  • Vibration Control
  • AirBlast from Blasting Operations

Slope Stability

Assessing the Outcomes

  • Measuring and Optimising fragmentation
  • Implementing field procedures to achieve consistent blast performance
  • Quantifying blast performance with key performance indicators
  • Defining the downstream effects of blast performance
  • Refining the blast designs to achieve the lowest overall cost

Course Details
CourseDates 
Energy Management15-17/5/19Enquire Now

Effective energy management requires a comprehensive understanding of technical, economic and regulatory aspects. Through planning and the operational awareness of energy-related activities and production processes, the formulation of an energy management practices can result in resource conservation, energy cost savings and the organisational contribution to environmental protection and climate action.

This three-day course presents the dimensions of energy management and its relevance to mining, manufacturing and industrial activities. A comprehensive and active energy management system targets known and revealed challenges, and sets the pathways for ratified energy policies, continuous improvement and realistic and achievable goals and.

The basics and lessons learnt in energy recommendations for utilities (power, water, gas), lighting basics and illumination system improvements, electric motors, operational and production scheduling, maintenance programs and project commissioning will be discussed through qualitative and quantitative examples.

Ideally, delegates attending this course with have an elementary understanding of technical terminology and energy principles with a minimum of one year of relevant work experience.  A basic to intermediate level spreadsheet skills using MS Excel is recommended.

Course Content

  • Life cycle costing of energy supply, demand and consumption
    • When, where and how is energy utilised
  • Understanding energy costs for energy purchasing, accounting and benchmarking
    • Energy and electricity rate structures
  • Electrical systems and electric energy management
  • Economic analysis and life cycle costing
  • Conducting an energy audit based on Energy Management Systems (ISO 50001), associated energy codes, standards and protocols
  • Compiling compliant audit reports
  • Introduction into industrial and commercial energy for multiple activities
    • Lighting basics and lighting system improvements
    • Electric motors and industrial systems
    • Thermal energy storage
    • Boilers and thermal systems improvement
    • Waste heat, co-generation, CHP systems
    • Renewable energy sources
    • Maintenance programs and building commissioning
    • Building automation and control systems
    • M&V and alternative financing
    • Green buildings and LEED
  • Framing an effective staff awareness campaign

 

Course Details
CourseDates 
Carbon Footprint Analysis and
Organisational GHG Accounting
20-21/5/19Enquire Now

Industries and companies are realising the need to evaluate business risks and strategies for a low carbon future. By assessing their energy consumption, they are able to review their impact on the environment and on climate change.

This two-day course teaches organisational GHG accounting in accordance with the Greenhouse Gas Protocol and the ISO 14064 standard. This standard provides the requirements and guidance for companies and other organizations to quantify and publicly report an inventory of GHG emissions and removals associated with a products and activities.

The Carbon Accounting Methodology and practical exercises are explained and practiced. The compilation of the carbon inventory methods are discussed with the perspective of public reporting and social costs. The course also provides an overview of the different types of Carbon Markets (mandatory and voluntary) and the Trading Mechanisms (command-and-control and market approaches).

The latest available information on (specified) country and the global contribution to carbon emissions and the national and international policies and frameworks for carbon taxation, based on carbon emission targets are presented.

Ideally, delegates attending this course with have an elementary understanding of technical terminology with a minimum of one year of relevant work experience.  A basic to intermediate level spreadsheet skills using MS Excel is recommended.

Course Content

  • Understanding the concepts and reasons for organisational GHG accounting
    • Greenhouse Gas effect and climate change
    • Greenhouse Gas Protocol and the ISO 14064 standard
    • Greenhouse gases and emissions sources
    • Steps for a Carbon Footprint Assessment
  • Classifying emissions sources
  • Data collection and tools to overcome information shortfalls
  • Setting a baseline and boundaries
  • GHG calculations
  • Data assessment and data quality control
  • Importance of validation and verification
  • Compiling a compliant report for disclosure
  • Develop and conduct a practical Carbon Footprint Assessment for an organisation
  • Carbon monitoring, reductions and offsetting
  • Sell the carbon footprint to your management or customer
  • Understanding the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)
  • Unpacking the categories of carbon instruments
  • Identifying carbon markets and what is involved for carbon trading

 

Course Details
CourseDates 
Environmental Economics23-24/5/19Enquire Now

Environmental economics is the study of environmental consumption, wastage and depletion through economics. In this discipline, the value of natural resources, and typical techno-economic concerns, such as market failure, externality, or valuation, are applied to environmental topics.

Exploiting natural resources is a necessary part of life and needed for growth and the advancement of society. Therefore, topics such as the balance between the least amount of usage and the greatest societal benefit are studied.  Environmental economists combine the two fields, encouraging economic and societal advancement without forgetting the effect they may be having on the environment.  In just two days, you will receive an exposure to the economics of the environment as a sub-discipline of economics focusing on the inter-relationships between the environment and the economy.

Basic concepts in economic theory are first introduced, and this is progressed to property rights and how markets behave and the failure to achieve economically efficient allocations thus resulting in environmental pollution and degradation.  The approaches that are available for environmental valuation are explored. An example is presented on the integration of environmental economics into a typical mining or industrial projects.

Environmental policy making and the concept of sustainable development are examined through the instruments of environmental policy, from command-and-control methods to economic or incentive-based mechanisms.  The fundamental link and quantitative balance of these resource extremes, namely mineral and environmental, is presented based on the circular flow model, and through case studies of market failures and full/social costs of transactions (private costs and external/environmental costs).

The theory and practise of the benefit-cost analysis is presented based on a typical mining project, from demand and willingness-to-pay perspectives, damage and abatement costing, and economic efficiency for mining activity problems.

Ideally, delegates should have an elementary understanding of technical terminology and energy and economic principles together with a minimum of one year of relevant work experience. A basic to intermediate level spreadsheet skills using MS Excel is recommended.

You will learn:

  • e Basics of Economics
  • Economy of the Environment and Sustainability
    • Effective governance
  • Environmental economics techniques
    • Environmental economics fundamentals
    • Valuation (project appraisal)
    • Market failure
    • Value of risks to environment
  • Corporate environment economics
    • Environmentally extended input-output analysis
    • Business case for environment economics
    • Policy instruments
  • Environmental policy and resource use
  • Trade and international environmental issues
  • International environmental problems

What will delegates achieve with this course?

Our training imparts multiple skills for participants to integrate environmental economics into mineral economics and mining projects with confidence and to:

  • Understand the concept of energy economics by engineers, managers, and staff in procurement, facilities management, finance, CSR and sustainability
  • Value companies from juniors to major corporations from an environmental perspective that is incorporated into mineral economics
  • Determine the correct environmental valuation approach to provide a techno-financial perspective of the company and/or projects
    • Recognise best practice and correct application of environmental valuation methods
    • Understanding the key risk factors, mitigation and adaptation, and mainstreaming
  • Analyse environmental valuation techniques and reporting
    • Overview of the value of project studies including environmental economics, independent technical reports and due diligence
  • Review environmental valuations presented in the public domain
    • Increasing efficiency to make decisions on investment opportunities
    • Reasons why investors invest capital in mining industry when environmental economics are considered

Course Details
CourseDates 
Mine Sampling and Assay Data Quality (QAQC) Management4-7/3/19Enquire Now

Access to sampling and assay data of the highest integrity is key to evaluating and exploiting mineral resources and reserves.  The resource and reserve define the asset and companies rely on the quality and accuracy of the data used in processes, such as, resource and reserve estimates, classification of ore and waste, reconciliation of production to plan and mineral beneficiation.  Poorly defined procedures and actions have tremendous consequences.

To assist mine personnel maintain the integrity of the data, a robust QAQC system is a “must have” in any sampling/assaying programme and minimising the errors and faults that may occur throughout the stages of the assay process that eventuate in an assay value is essential.

Developed for geologists, mining engineers and metallurgists involved in maintaining and analysing sampling and quality control systems in mineral projects/operating mines, this course provides participants with an overview of sampling techniques, analytical methods used in the field or laboratory and quality control systems.  The intent is to help the participants understand the systems they work with.

Course Content

Sampling and Analytical Methods

  • Precision, accuracy & bias
  • Sampling Errors
  • Sample collection
  • Sample description
  • Sub-sampling & splitting
  • Laboratory Analytical Methods and Limits of Detection
  • Bulk Density determination

Quality Control Systems

  • Quality Control Concepts
  • Use of Standard Reference Materials as control points
  • Duplicates, Replicates and Referee Samples
  • Statistics and Control Charts
  • Setting up an appropriate Quality Control programme.
  • Reconciliation of assay results with sample descriptions
  • Commercial software vs Excel spreadsheets
Course Details
CourseDates 
Mine Grade Control and Reconciliation25-28/2/19Enquire Now

“Minimise Ore to Waste and Waste to Ore.”  It seems like an easy to understand statement, but it goes beyond unplanned loss or dilution.  Misclassification involves: sampling practices, level of unit selectivity for ore/waste definition, inappropriate selection/us of estimation parameters and poor mining practice.  It is no one thing, it is an accumulation of errors.

The Grade Control part of the course combines participants understanding methodologies to be used, with practical exercises based on best practice in grade control techniques to minimise misclassification of ore and waste.  The course covers: sampling for grade control models, a survey of currently used estimation methods, ore definition and ore boundary control and information management options.  The course will also look at why the grade control model and resource model are different.

Mine reconciliation is not accounting! The objective of mining reconciliation is not to get two sets of numbers to balance, which is often seen as an end in itself, by those focused on factors, but rather to help identify and understand the discrepancies that occur throughout the reconciliation process in order to assess and improve the processes involved.

This course presents participants with reconciliation as a quality control and oreflow management tool.  The course introduces the mining value chain, measurement points along the chain, reconciliation between points in the value chain and between periods in the Life-of-Mine.   Exercises provide examples of calculations in the reconciliation process.

Course Content

Grade Control Techniques & Modelling

  • The grade control process
  • Mapping and logging
  • Survey control
  • Grade control sampling and quality control systems
  • Trenching, core, RC samples and blasthole samples
  • Assaying and Bulk density
  • Grade control modelling
  • Costs and cut-off grades
  • Selectivity and Ore / waste definition
  • Dig plans
  • Mark outs
  • Blast movement
  • Stockpile management
  • Procedures and database management

Mine Reconciliation

  • Mining value chain
  • Reconciliation as a quality control tool.
  • Ore flows, risk assessment, sampling
  • Measurement points in the value chain, standard reconciliation nomenclature
  • Point to Point Reconciliation, geology, mine, plant, transport – data and calculations
  • Period on Period Reconciliation – data and calculations
  • Reconciliation systems and software tools for data management and analysis.
Course Details
CourseDates 
Mineral Resource Estimation (Theory and Practical)25/2 - 1/3/19Enquire Now

This course has been designed for geologists and mining engineers involved with or are interested in becoming involved with mineral resource estimation for prospect evaluation, grade control or long-term planning.  The course requires a knowledge of geology and/or mine planning but does not require prior knowledge of geostatistics.  Participants should have computer skills associated with geology modelling, grade control or mine planning software.

The course requires the use of Microsoft Excel and geostatistical modelling software to complete the practical portion. Participants can bring their own commercial software or use ours, which will be provided for practical exercises.

Course Content

  • Introduction to modelling and its purpose.
  • Role and responsibilities of the mineral resource modeller.
  • Exploratory Data Analysis – Data Quality, Geology and Descriptive Statistics
  • Modifying Data-Domaining, Top cutting and Compositing
  • Spatial Relationships and Variography
  • Estimation Methodologies (Nearest Neighbour, Inverse Distance and Linear Regression-Kriging)
  • Choosing Estimation Parameters-block sizes and search neighbourhoods
  • Estimation
  • Validation
  • Classification
  • Documentation
  • Workflows for various commercial software or GSLIB.
Course Details
CourseDates 
Fundamentals of Pit Optimisation and Mine Planning
and Contracts Management
4-8/3/19Enquire Now

Optimisation commences with the identification of key value drivers and risks based on the available project or operations data such as geological data, geotechnical data, metallurgical test-work data, drill and blast requirements to meet process requirements, logistics and potential constraints.  The key challenge is to simultaneously optimise elements of the value chain rather than to optimise component parts in isolation from the remainder of the elements.  Mine to mill optimisation is therefore based on building an integrated geological, mining and processing model that allows optimization of variables along the value chain.

The two-day Optimisation course focuses on the optimisation levers available to mine planners and operations management to enhance the base plan. The workshop will also assist management and shareholders who are not mining and mineral processing technical experts to be able to assess if optimal mineral asset shareholder value has been considered.

Mine planners ensure value maximisation through decisions on mine design, scheduling alternatives, ore definition, ore access, equipment selection, and ore and waste removal sequences and continually apply forward-looking exercises based on the updated geological model and modifying factors.

This part of the course is designed to assist mine managers, planners, production engineers and other mineral industry professionals to have a better understanding of open pit mine planning and design processes. The course covers the key elements of mine planning premised on mineral resource to mineral reserve conversion process.

Following the above, the optimisation section of the course is designed to inform and inspire business leaders, mine managers, mine planners and mineral asset advisers about the use of the latest optimization concepts and strategies. Optimisation techniques can be used to enhance the value of the business by maximizing value associated with the flow of ore through the different elements of the value chain.

The last part of this course provides delegates with the fundamentals behind compiling and managing mining contracts, with focus on; different contract types and their structure; the tendering process; the principles of contract negotiation; management and dispute resolution.

Course Details
CourseDates 
Optimal Open Pit Blasting Techniques
Metal, Coal and Quarry Operations
27/2-1/3/19 (Met)
4/3 - 6/3/19 (Coal)
Enquire Now

This course introduces mine personnel involved in the blasting process to the latest techniques and methods.  The course will focus on Blast Optimisation thereby ensuring downstream benefits through improved drilling and blasting operations.  The course focuses on the generic details of blasting products with no particular emphasis on specific manufacturers and their products, thereby ensuring impartiality.

Opportunities will be given for delegates to introduce the course attendees to their individual technical challenges at their mine site for discussion, with a collective review of their existing blasting techniques and procedures part of the course.

The course will cover the following:

Understanding the basics

  • Understanding your Current designs
  • Major factors influencing blast efficiency
  • Rock fragmentation by blasting
  • Three keys to improving explosive performance
  • Geological effects on blast performance
  • Defining blast performance goals and developing designs
  • Selecting the best explosive for site conditions
  • Initiation Systems
  • Drilling your Blastholes
  • Geological Considerations
  • Fragmentation Optimization
  • Vibration Control
  • AirBlast from Blasting Operations

Slope Stability

Assessing the Outcomes

  • Measuring and Optimising fragmentation
  • Implementing field procedures to achieve consistent blast performance
  • Quantifying blast performance with key performance indicators
  • Defining the downstream effects of blast performance
  • Refining the blast designs to achieve the lowest overall cost

Course Details
CourseDates 
Working with Coal Quality Data25/2 - 1/3/19Enquire Now

This course covers the numerical evaluation of coal quality data, beginning with the assessment of the raw data derived from the individual sampled ‘plies’ in each unique borehole intersection, and the compounding of these results into full seam composites. The evaluation is then extended to the elementary statistical analysis of project data sets comprising the full complement of available borehole intersections.

The statistical analysis includes simple data validation techniques designed to highlight data errors and anomalous results in both the physical and the quality attributes of the coal deposit. It also provides valid average values and ranges for these physical and quality data. The numerical work utilises standard Microsoft Excel software.

The statistical analysis is facilitated by the generation of a project-specific database which is also designed to be compatible with ‘user-friendly’ modelling packages such as ‘Surfer or MINEX’, which can then be utilised to produce both physical and quality models of the coal deposit.

The preliminary investigation of the washability characteristics of the coal are also covered in this course.

 Course Content

  • Derivation of Seam Quality Composites from Raw Assay Data
  • Database Layout
  • Data Validation
  • Estimation of Average Physical and Quality Parameters
  • Coal Quality Reporting
Course Details
CourseDates 
Coal Resource Modelling and Estimation4-8/3/19Enquire Now

Providing theory and practical applications, delegates learn how to generate models and estimate the Resource.

The first part of the course teaches delegates how to utilise a quality coal database to generate 2D and 3D physical coal deposit models and to model trends in the quality attributes of the coal. These models are produced using modelling software. Many modelling algorithms are investigated and the various advantages and disadvantages of each are evaluated during the course.

The second part of the course utilises these models to calculate resource areas and volumes as a prelude to the estimation of resource tonnages and provision of their resource classification.

The course ultimately provides delegates with a basic guide to compiling the Competent Person’s reports (CPR’s), acceptable to JORC, NI 43-101 and SAMREC standards.

Course Content

  • Deposit Modelling Methods
  • Theoretical Geological Losses
  • Physical Resource Modelling
  • Coal Quality Modelling
  • Resource Calculations and Resource Estimation
Course Details
CourseDates 
Coal Resource and Reserve Reporting for Public Companies25/2 - 1/3/19Enquire Now

This course is designed to provide the participants with a short history of and context to the regulations relating to coal exploration and coal mining, and to present the primary reference materials used in the reporting of Coal Resources and Coal Reserves.  This course helps technical specialists involved in reporting, to meet the formatting requirements for these reports, and offers guidelines on how to comment on the quality of technical information and risk factors.

Learning the requirements for content and formatting of these reports is based on memorizing basic rules, collecting and learning how to use a set of appropriate reference documents and adopting behaviours and attitudes aligned with independent thinking, personal responsibility and professional ethics.

The list of examples used to demonstrate acceptable reporting formats addresses areas of greatest concern, where practice is difficult and/or poorly complied with.

Course Content

  • Resource Codes (JORC, NI43-101, SAMREC)
  • Understanding the Requirements of the SANS 10320 Document
  • Project Evaluation and CPR Preparation
Course Details
CourseDates 
Mining Geology and Mining Practices 10125-26/2/19Enquire Now

There are many people involved or associated with the mining industry who have not worked on a mine site and do not necessarily understand the mining processes.  This two-day course highlights the underlying geology that provides mineral wealth to be exploited and is followed by an insight into the different facets of mining needed to make a viable ore deposit a success.

Delegates will leave the course with a better understanding of mining.

You will be provided with:

  • An introduction to the main rock types (igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary)
  • How the structure of the earth provides us with the minerals we mine
  • The identification of iron ore, gold, nickel, base metals and bauxite deposits and more
  • An overview of the formation of coal, oil and gas deposits
  • An overview of drilling and sample methods
  • Undertake a sampling exercise and identify sampling errors
  • The application of resource estimation to quantify a mineral deposit

The Mining session provides delegates with an overview of the mining cycle for open pit and underground mines, from feasibility studies to mine closure.  The iterative planning process is discussed, and delegates will be able to see that a mine continually plans and plans.

Audio Visual aids provide visualisation of the mining process, incorporating open-pit and various underground mining operations.

You will learn about:

  • The life of a mine from exploration through to mine closure
  • Open Pit and Underground mining
  • Pre-feasibility and feasibility studies
  • Mine planning; optimisation, scheduling, cut-off grades
  • Mine Planning activities
  • Capital and Operating Costs
  • Mine closure and rehabilitation
Course Details
CourseDates 
Energy Management27/2 - 1/3/19Enquire Now

Effective energy management requires a comprehensive understanding of technical, economic and regulatory aspects. Through planning and the operational awareness of energy-related activities and production processes, the formulation of an energy management practices can result in resource conservation, energy cost savings and the organisational contribution to environmental protection and climate action.

This three-day course presents the dimensions of energy management and its relevance to mining, manufacturing and industrial activities. A comprehensive and active energy management system targets known and revealed challenges, and sets the pathways for ratified energy policies, continuous improvement and realistic and achievable goals and.

The basics and lessons learnt in energy recommendations for utilities (power, water, gas), lighting basics and illumination system improvements, electric motors, operational and production scheduling, maintenance programs and project commissioning will be discussed through qualitative and quantitative examples.

Ideally, delegates attending this course with have an elementary understanding of technical terminology and energy principles with a minimum of one year of relevant work experience.  A basic to intermediate level spreadsheet skills using MS Excel is recommended.

Course Content

  • Life cycle costing of energy supply, demand and consumption
    • When, where and how is energy utilised
  • Understanding energy costs for energy purchasing, accounting and benchmarking
    • Energy and electricity rate structures
  • Electrical systems and electric energy management
  • Economic analysis and life cycle costing
  • Conducting an energy audit based on Energy Management Systems (ISO 50001), associated energy codes, standards and protocols
  • Compiling compliant audit reports
  • Introduction into industrial and commercial energy for multiple activities
    • Lighting basics and lighting system improvements
    • Electric motors and industrial systems
    • Thermal energy storage
    • Boilers and thermal systems improvement
    • Waste heat, co-generation, CHP systems
    • Renewable energy sources
    • Maintenance programs and building commissioning
    • Building automation and control systems
    • M&V and alternative financing
    • Green buildings and LEED
  • Framing an effective staff awareness campaign

 

Course Details
CourseDates 
Carbon Footprint Analysis and
Organisational GHG Accounting
4-5/3/19Enquire Now

Industries and companies are realising the need to evaluate business risks and strategies for a low carbon future. By assessing their energy consumption, they are able to review their impact on the environment and on climate change.

This two-day course teaches organisational GHG accounting in accordance with the Greenhouse Gas Protocol and the ISO 14064 standard. This standard provides the requirements and guidance for companies and other organizations to quantify and publicly report an inventory of GHG emissions and removals associated with a products and activities.

The Carbon Accounting Methodology and practical exercises are explained and practiced. The compilation of the carbon inventory methods are discussed with the perspective of public reporting and social costs. The course also provides an overview of the different types of Carbon Markets (mandatory and voluntary) and the Trading Mechanisms (command-and-control and market approaches).

The latest available information on (specified) country and the global contribution to carbon emissions and the national and international policies and frameworks for carbon taxation, based on carbon emission targets are presented.

Ideally, delegates attending this course with have an elementary understanding of technical terminology with a minimum of one year of relevant work experience.  A basic to intermediate level spreadsheet skills using MS Excel is recommended.

Course Content

  • Understanding the concepts and reasons for organisational GHG accounting
    • Greenhouse Gas effect and climate change
    • Greenhouse Gas Protocol and the ISO 14064 standard
    • Greenhouse gases and emissions sources
    • Steps for a Carbon Footprint Assessment
  • Classifying emissions sources
  • Data collection and tools to overcome information shortfalls
  • Setting a baseline and boundaries
  • GHG calculations
  • Data assessment and data quality control
  • Importance of validation and verification
  • Compiling a compliant report for disclosure
  • Develop and conduct a practical Carbon Footprint Assessment for an organisation
  • Carbon monitoring, reductions and offsetting
  • Sell the carbon footprint to your management or customer
  • Understanding the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)
  • Unpacking the categories of carbon instruments
  • Identifying carbon markets and what is involved for carbon trading

 

Course Details
CourseDates 
Environmental Economics7-8/3/19Enquire Now

Environmental economics is the study of environmental consumption, wastage and depletion through economics. In this discipline, the value of natural resources, and typical techno-economic concerns, such as market failure, externality, or valuation, are applied to environmental topics.

Exploiting natural resources is a necessary part of life and needed for growth and the advancement of society. Therefore, topics such as the balance between the least amount of usage and the greatest societal benefit are studied.  Environmental economists combine the two fields, encouraging economic and societal advancement without forgetting the effect they may be having on the environment.  In just two days, you will receive an exposure to the economics of the environment as a sub-discipline of economics focusing on the inter-relationships between the environment and the economy.

Basic concepts in economic theory are first introduced, and this is progressed to property rights and how markets behave and the failure to achieve economically efficient allocations thus resulting in environmental pollution and degradation.  The approaches that are available for environmental valuation are explored. An example is presented on the integration of environmental economics into a typical mining or industrial projects.

Environmental policy making and the concept of sustainable development are examined through the instruments of environmental policy, from command-and-control methods to economic or incentive-based mechanisms.  The fundamental link and quantitative balance of these resource extremes, namely mineral and environmental, is presented based on the circular flow model, and through case studies of market failures and full/social costs of transactions (private costs and external/environmental costs).

The theory and practise of the benefit-cost analysis is presented based on a typical mining project, from demand and willingness-to-pay perspectives, damage and abatement costing, and economic efficiency for mining activity problems.

Ideally, delegates should have an elementary understanding of technical terminology and energy and economic principles together with a minimum of one year of relevant work experience. A basic to intermediate level spreadsheet skills using MS Excel is recommended.

You will learn:

  • e Basics of Economics
  • Economy of the Environment and Sustainability
    • Effective governance
  • Environmental economics techniques
    • Environmental economics fundamentals
    • Valuation (project appraisal)
    • Market failure
    • Value of risks to environment
  • Corporate environment economics
    • Environmentally extended input-output analysis
    • Business case for environment economics
    • Policy instruments
  • Environmental policy and resource use
  • Trade and international environmental issues
  • International environmental problems

What will delegates achieve with this course?

Our training imparts multiple skills for participants to integrate environmental economics into mineral economics and mining projects with confidence and to:

  • Understand the concept of energy economics by engineers, managers, and staff in procurement, facilities management, finance, CSR and sustainability
  • Value companies from juniors to major corporations from an environmental perspective that is incorporated into mineral economics
  • Determine the correct environmental valuation approach to provide a techno-financial perspective of the company and/or projects
    • Recognise best practice and correct application of environmental valuation methods
    • Understanding the key risk factors, mitigation and adaptation, and mainstreaming
  • Analyse environmental valuation techniques and reporting
    • Overview of the value of project studies including environmental economics, independent technical reports and due diligence
  • Review environmental valuations presented in the public domain
    • Increasing efficiency to make decisions on investment opportunities
    • Reasons why investors invest capital in mining industry when environmental economics are considered

Course Details
CourseDates 
Mine Sampling and Assay Data Quality (QAQC) Management12-15 Feb 2019Enquire Now

Access to sampling and assay data of the highest integrity is key to evaluating and exploiting mineral resources and reserves.  The resource and reserve define the asset and companies rely on the quality and accuracy of the data used in processes, such as, resource and reserve estimates, classification of ore and waste, reconciliation of production to plan and mineral beneficiation.  Poorly defined procedures and actions have tremendous consequences.

To assist mine personnel maintain the integrity of the data, a robust QAQC system is a “must have” in any sampling/assaying programme and minimising the errors and faults that may occur throughout the stages of the assay process that eventuate in an assay value is essential.

Developed for geologists, mining engineers and metallurgists involved in maintaining and analysing sampling and quality control systems in mineral projects/operating mines, this course provides participants with an overview of sampling techniques, analytical methods used in the field or laboratory and quality control systems.  The intent is to help the participants understand the systems they work with.

Course Content

Sampling and Analytical Methods

  • Precision, accuracy & bias
  • Sampling Errors
  • Sample collection
  • Sample description
  • Sub-sampling & splitting
  • Laboratory Analytical Methods and Limits of Detection
  • Bulk Density determination

Quality Control Systems

  • Quality Control Concepts
  • Use of Standard Reference Materials as control points
  • Duplicates, Replicates and Referee Samples
  • Statistics and Control Charts
  • Setting up an appropriate Quality Control programme.
  • Reconciliation of assay results with sample descriptions
  • Commercial software vs Excel spreadsheets
Course Details
CourseDates 
Mine Grade Control and Reconciliation18-21/2/19Enquire Now

“Minimise Ore to Waste and Waste to Ore.”  It seems like an easy to understand statement, but it goes beyond unplanned loss or dilution.  Misclassification involves: sampling practices, level of unit selectivity for ore/waste definition, inappropriate selection/us of estimation parameters and poor mining practice.  It is no one thing, it is an accumulation of errors.

The Grade Control part of the course combines participants understanding methodologies to be used, with practical exercises based on best practice in grade control techniques to minimise misclassification of ore and waste.  The course covers: sampling for grade control models, a survey of currently used estimation methods, ore definition and ore boundary control and information management options.  The course will also look at why the grade control model and resource model are different.

Mine reconciliation is not accounting! The objective of mining reconciliation is not to get two sets of numbers to balance, which is often seen as an end in itself, by those focused on factors, but rather to help identify and understand the discrepancies that occur throughout the reconciliation process in order to assess and improve the processes involved.

This course presents participants with reconciliation as a quality control and oreflow management tool.  The course introduces the mining value chain, measurement points along the chain, reconciliation between points in the value chain and between periods in the Life-of-Mine.   Exercises provide examples of calculations in the reconciliation process.

Course Content

Grade Control Techniques & Modelling

  • The grade control process
  • Mapping and logging
  • Survey control
  • Grade control sampling and quality control systems
  • Trenching, core, RC samples and blasthole samples
  • Assaying and Bulk density
  • Grade control modelling
  • Costs and cut-off grades
  • Selectivity and Ore / waste definition
  • Dig plans
  • Mark outs
  • Blast movement
  • Stockpile management
  • Procedures and database management

Mine Reconciliation

  • Mining value chain
  • Reconciliation as a quality control tool.
  • Ore flows, risk assessment, sampling
  • Measurement points in the value chain, standard reconciliation nomenclature
  • Point to Point Reconciliation, geology, mine, plant, transport – data and calculations
  • Period on Period Reconciliation – data and calculations
  • Reconciliation systems and software tools for data management and analysis.
Course Details
CourseDates 
Mineral Resource Estimation (Theory and Practical)18-22/2/19Enquire Now

This course has been designed for geologists and mining engineers involved with or are interested in becoming involved with mineral resource estimation for prospect evaluation, grade control or long-term planning.  The course requires a knowledge of geology and/or mine planning but does not require prior knowledge of geostatistics.  Participants should have computer skills associated with geology modelling, grade control or mine planning software.

The course requires the use of Microsoft Excel and geostatistical modelling software to complete the practical portion. Participants can bring their own commercial software or use ours, which will be provided for practical exercises.

Course Content

  • Introduction to modelling and its purpose.
  • Role and responsibilities of the mineral resource modeller.
  • Exploratory Data Analysis – Data Quality, Geology and Descriptive Statistics
  • Modifying Data-Domaining, Top cutting and Compositing
  • Spatial Relationships and Variography
  • Estimation Methodologies (Nearest Neighbour, Inverse Distance and Linear Regression-Kriging)
  • Choosing Estimation Parameters-block sizes and search neighbourhoods
  • Estimation
  • Validation
  • Classification
  • Documentation
  • Workflows for various commercial software or GSLIB.
Course Details
CourseDates 
Working with Coal Quality Data11-15/2/19Enquire Now

This course covers the numerical evaluation of coal quality data, beginning with the assessment of the raw data derived from the individual sampled ‘plies’ in each unique borehole intersection, and the compounding of these results into full seam composites. The evaluation is then extended to the elementary statistical analysis of project data sets comprising the full complement of available borehole intersections.

The statistical analysis includes simple data validation techniques designed to highlight data errors and anomalous results in both the physical and the quality attributes of the coal deposit. It also provides valid average values and ranges for these physical and quality data. The numerical work utilises standard Microsoft Excel software.

The statistical analysis is facilitated by the generation of a project-specific database which is also designed to be compatible with ‘user-friendly’ modelling packages such as ‘Surfer or MINEX’, which can then be utilised to produce both physical and quality models of the coal deposit.

The preliminary investigation of the washability characteristics of the coal are also covered in this course.

 Course Content

  • Derivation of Seam Quality Composites from Raw Assay Data
  • Database Layout
  • Data Validation
  • Estimation of Average Physical and Quality Parameters
  • Coal Quality Reporting
Course Details
CourseDates 
Coal Resource Modelling and Estimation18-22/2/19Enquire Now

Providing theory and practical applications, delegates learn how to generate models and estimate the Resource.

The first part of the course teaches delegates how to utilise a quality coal database to generate 2D and 3D physical coal deposit models and to model trends in the quality attributes of the coal. These models are produced using modelling software. Many modelling algorithms are investigated and the various advantages and disadvantages of each are evaluated during the course.

The second part of the course utilises these models to calculate resource areas and volumes as a prelude to the estimation of resource tonnages and provision of their resource classification.

The course ultimately provides delegates with a basic guide to compiling the Competent Person’s reports (CPR’s), acceptable to JORC, NI 43-101 and SAMREC standards.

Course Content

  • Deposit Modelling Methods
  • Theoretical Geological Losses
  • Physical Resource Modelling
  • Coal Quality Modelling
  • Resource Calculations and Resource Estimation
Course Details
CourseDates 
Coal Resource and Reserve Reporting for Public Companies11-15/2/16Enquire Now

This course is designed to provide the participants with a short history of and context to the regulations relating to coal exploration and coal mining, and to present the primary reference materials used in the reporting of Coal Resources and Coal Reserves.  This course helps technical specialists involved in reporting, to meet the formatting requirements for these reports, and offers guidelines on how to comment on the quality of technical information and risk factors.

Learning the requirements for content and formatting of these reports is based on memorizing basic rules, collecting and learning how to use a set of appropriate reference documents and adopting behaviours and attitudes aligned with independent thinking, personal responsibility and professional ethics.

The list of examples used to demonstrate acceptable reporting formats addresses areas of greatest concern, where practice is difficult and/or poorly complied with.

Course Content

  • Resource Codes (JORC, NI43-101, SAMREC)
  • Understanding the Requirements of the SANS 10320 Document
  • Project Evaluation and CPR Preparation
Course Details
CourseDates 
Mining Geology and Mining Practices 10111-12/2/19Enquire Now

There are many people involved or associated with the mining industry who have not worked on a mine site and do not necessarily understand the mining processes.  This two-day course highlights the underlying geology that provides mineral wealth to be exploited and is followed by an insight into the different facets of mining needed to make a viable ore deposit a success.

Delegates will leave the course with a better understanding of mining.

You will be provided with:

  • An introduction to the main rock types (igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary)
  • How the structure of the earth provides us with the minerals we mine
  • The identification of iron ore, gold, nickel, base metals and bauxite deposits and more
  • An overview of the formation of coal, oil and gas deposits
  • An overview of drilling and sample methods
  • Undertake a sampling exercise and identify sampling errors
  • The application of resource estimation to quantify a mineral deposit

The Mining session provides delegates with an overview of the mining cycle for open pit and underground mines, from feasibility studies to mine closure.  The iterative planning process is discussed, and delegates will be able to see that a mine continually plans and plans.

Audio Visual aids provide visualisation of the mining process, incorporating open-pit and various underground mining operations.

You will learn about:

  • The life of a mine from exploration through to mine closure
  • Open Pit and Underground mining
  • Pre-feasibility and feasibility studies
  • Mine planning; optimisation, scheduling, cut-off grades
  • Mine Planning activities
  • Capital and Operating Costs
  • Mine closure and rehabilitation
Course Details
CourseDates 
Energy Management13-15/2/19Enquire Now

Effective energy management requires a comprehensive understanding of technical, economic and regulatory aspects. Through planning and the operational awareness of energy-related activities and production processes, the formulation of an energy management practices can result in resource conservation, energy cost savings and the organisational contribution to environmental protection and climate action.

This three-day course presents the dimensions of energy management and its relevance to mining, manufacturing and industrial activities. A comprehensive and active energy management system targets known and revealed challenges, and sets the pathways for ratified energy policies, continuous improvement and realistic and achievable goals and.

The basics and lessons learnt in energy recommendations for utilities (power, water, gas), lighting basics and illumination system improvements, electric motors, operational and production scheduling, maintenance programs and project commissioning will be discussed through qualitative and quantitative examples.

Ideally, delegates attending this course with have an elementary understanding of technical terminology and energy principles with a minimum of one year of relevant work experience.  A basic to intermediate level spreadsheet skills using MS Excel is recommended.

Course Content

  • Life cycle costing of energy supply, demand and consumption
    • When, where and how is energy utilised
  • Understanding energy costs for energy purchasing, accounting and benchmarking
    • Energy and electricity rate structures
  • Electrical systems and electric energy management
  • Economic analysis and life cycle costing
  • Conducting an energy audit based on Energy Management Systems (ISO 50001), associated energy codes, standards and protocols
  • Compiling compliant audit reports
  • Introduction into industrial and commercial energy for multiple activities
    • Lighting basics and lighting system improvements
    • Electric motors and industrial systems
    • Thermal energy storage
    • Boilers and thermal systems improvement
    • Waste heat, co-generation, CHP systems
    • Renewable energy sources
    • Maintenance programs and building commissioning
    • Building automation and control systems
    • M&V and alternative financing
    • Green buildings and LEED
  • Framing an effective staff awareness campaign

 

Course Details
CourseDates 
Carbon Footprint Analysis and
Organisational GHG Accounting
18-19/2Enquire Now

Industries and companies are realising the need to evaluate business risks and strategies for a low carbon future. By assessing their energy consumption, they are able to review their impact on the environment and on climate change.

This two-day course teaches organisational GHG accounting in accordance with the Greenhouse Gas Protocol and the ISO 14064 standard. This standard provides the requirements and guidance for companies and other organizations to quantify and publicly report an inventory of GHG emissions and removals associated with a products and activities.

The Carbon Accounting Methodology and practical exercises are explained and practiced. The compilation of the carbon inventory methods are discussed with the perspective of public reporting and social costs. The course also provides an overview of the different types of Carbon Markets (mandatory and voluntary) and the Trading Mechanisms (command-and-control and market approaches).

The latest available information on (specified) country and the global contribution to carbon emissions and the national and international policies and frameworks for carbon taxation, based on carbon emission targets are presented.

Ideally, delegates attending this course with have an elementary understanding of technical terminology with a minimum of one year of relevant work experience.  A basic to intermediate level spreadsheet skills using MS Excel is recommended.

Course Content

  • Understanding the concepts and reasons for organisational GHG accounting
    • Greenhouse Gas effect and climate change
    • Greenhouse Gas Protocol and the ISO 14064 standard
    • Greenhouse gases and emissions sources
    • Steps for a Carbon Footprint Assessment
  • Classifying emissions sources
  • Data collection and tools to overcome information shortfalls
  • Setting a baseline and boundaries
  • GHG calculations
  • Data assessment and data quality control
  • Importance of validation and verification
  • Compiling a compliant report for disclosure
  • Develop and conduct a practical Carbon Footprint Assessment for an organisation
  • Carbon monitoring, reductions and offsetting
  • Sell the carbon footprint to your management or customer
  • Understanding the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)
  • Unpacking the categories of carbon instruments
  • Identifying carbon markets and what is involved for carbon trading

 

Course Details
CourseDates 
Environmental Economics21-22/2/19Enquire Now

Environmental economics is the study of environmental consumption, wastage and depletion through economics. In this discipline, the value of natural resources, and typical techno-economic concerns, such as market failure, externality, or valuation, are applied to environmental topics.

Exploiting natural resources is a necessary part of life and needed for growth and the advancement of society. Therefore, topics such as the balance between the least amount of usage and the greatest societal benefit are studied.  Environmental economists combine the two fields, encouraging economic and societal advancement without forgetting the effect they may be having on the environment.  In just two days, you will receive an exposure to the economics of the environment as a sub-discipline of economics focusing on the inter-relationships between the environment and the economy.

Basic concepts in economic theory are first introduced, and this is progressed to property rights and how markets behave and the failure to achieve economically efficient allocations thus resulting in environmental pollution and degradation.  The approaches that are available for environmental valuation are explored. An example is presented on the integration of environmental economics into a typical mining or industrial projects.

Environmental policy making and the concept of sustainable development are examined through the instruments of environmental policy, from command-and-control methods to economic or incentive-based mechanisms.  The fundamental link and quantitative balance of these resource extremes, namely mineral and environmental, is presented based on the circular flow model, and through case studies of market failures and full/social costs of transactions (private costs and external/environmental costs).

The theory and practise of the benefit-cost analysis is presented based on a typical mining project, from demand and willingness-to-pay perspectives, damage and abatement costing, and economic efficiency for mining activity problems.

Ideally, delegates should have an elementary understanding of technical terminology and energy and economic principles together with a minimum of one year of relevant work experience. A basic to intermediate level spreadsheet skills using MS Excel is recommended.

You will learn:

  • e Basics of Economics
  • Economy of the Environment and Sustainability
    • Effective governance
  • Environmental economics techniques
    • Environmental economics fundamentals
    • Valuation (project appraisal)
    • Market failure
    • Value of risks to environment
  • Corporate environment economics
    • Environmentally extended input-output analysis
    • Business case for environment economics
    • Policy instruments
  • Environmental policy and resource use
  • Trade and international environmental issues
  • International environmental problems

What will delegates achieve with this course?

Our training imparts multiple skills for participants to integrate environmental economics into mineral economics and mining projects with confidence and to:

  • Understand the concept of energy economics by engineers, managers, and staff in procurement, facilities management, finance, CSR and sustainability
  • Value companies from juniors to major corporations from an environmental perspective that is incorporated into mineral economics
  • Determine the correct environmental valuation approach to provide a techno-financial perspective of the company and/or projects
    • Recognise best practice and correct application of environmental valuation methods
    • Understanding the key risk factors, mitigation and adaptation, and mainstreaming
  • Analyse environmental valuation techniques and reporting
    • Overview of the value of project studies including environmental economics, independent technical reports and due diligence
  • Review environmental valuations presented in the public domain
    • Increasing efficiency to make decisions on investment opportunities
    • Reasons why investors invest capital in mining industry when environmental economics are considered

Course Details
CourseDates 
Mine Sampling and Assay Data Quality (QAQC) Management12-15/11/19Enquire Now

Access to sampling and assay data of the highest integrity is key to evaluating and exploiting mineral resources and reserves.  The resource and reserve define the asset and companies rely on the quality and accuracy of the data used in processes, such as, resource and reserve estimates, classification of ore and waste, reconciliation of production to plan and mineral beneficiation.  Poorly defined procedures and actions have tremendous consequences.

To assist mine personnel maintain the integrity of the data, a robust QAQC system is a “must have” in any sampling/assaying programme and minimising the errors and faults that may occur throughout the stages of the assay process that eventuate in an assay value is essential.

Developed for geologists, mining engineers and metallurgists involved in maintaining and analysing sampling and quality control systems in mineral projects/operating mines, this course provides participants with an overview of sampling techniques, analytical methods used in the field or laboratory and quality control systems.  The intent is to help the participants understand the systems they work with.

Course Content

Sampling and Analytical Methods

  • Precision, accuracy & bias
  • Sampling Errors
  • Sample collection
  • Sample description
  • Sub-sampling & splitting
  • Laboratory Analytical Methods and Limits of Detection
  • Bulk Density determination

Quality Control Systems

  • Quality Control Concepts
  • Use of Standard Reference Materials as control points
  • Duplicates, Replicates and Referee Samples
  • Statistics and Control Charts
  • Setting up an appropriate Quality Control programme.
  • Reconciliation of assay results with sample descriptions
  • Commercial software vs Excel spreadsheets
Course Details
CourseDates 
Mine Grade Control and Reconciliation18-21/11/19Enquire Now

“Minimise Ore to Waste and Waste to Ore.”  It seems like an easy to understand statement, but it goes beyond unplanned loss or dilution.  Misclassification involves: sampling practices, level of unit selectivity for ore/waste definition, inappropriate selection/us of estimation parameters and poor mining practice.  It is no one thing, it is an accumulation of errors.

The Grade Control part of the course combines participants understanding methodologies to be used, with practical exercises based on best practice in grade control techniques to minimise misclassification of ore and waste.  The course covers: sampling for grade control models, a survey of currently used estimation methods, ore definition and ore boundary control and information management options.  The course will also look at why the grade control model and resource model are different.

Mine reconciliation is not accounting! The objective of mining reconciliation is not to get two sets of numbers to balance, which is often seen as an end in itself, by those focused on factors, but rather to help identify and understand the discrepancies that occur throughout the reconciliation process in order to assess and improve the processes involved.

This course presents participants with reconciliation as a quality control and oreflow management tool.  The course introduces the mining value chain, measurement points along the chain, reconciliation between points in the value chain and between periods in the Life-of-Mine.   Exercises provide examples of calculations in the reconciliation process.

Course Content

Grade Control Techniques & Modelling

  • The grade control process
  • Mapping and logging
  • Survey control
  • Grade control sampling and quality control systems
  • Trenching, core, RC samples and blasthole samples
  • Assaying and Bulk density
  • Grade control modelling
  • Costs and cut-off grades
  • Selectivity and Ore / waste definition
  • Dig plans
  • Mark outs
  • Blast movement
  • Stockpile management
  • Procedures and database management

Mine Reconciliation

  • Mining value chain
  • Reconciliation as a quality control tool.
  • Ore flows, risk assessment, sampling
  • Measurement points in the value chain, standard reconciliation nomenclature
  • Point to Point Reconciliation, geology, mine, plant, transport – data and calculations
  • Period on Period Reconciliation – data and calculations
  • Reconciliation systems and software tools for data management and analysis.
Course Details
CourseDates 
Mineral Resource Estimation (Theory and Practical)11-15/11/19Enquire Now

This course has been designed for geologists and mining engineers involved with or are interested in becoming involved with mineral resource estimation for prospect evaluation, grade control or long-term planning.  The course requires a knowledge of geology and/or mine planning but does not require prior knowledge of geostatistics.  Participants should have computer skills associated with geology modelling, grade control or mine planning software.

The course requires the use of Microsoft Excel and geostatistical modelling software to complete the practical portion. Participants can bring their own commercial software or use ours, which will be provided for practical exercises.

Course Content

  • Introduction to modelling and its purpose.
  • Role and responsibilities of the mineral resource modeller.
  • Exploratory Data Analysis – Data Quality, Geology and Descriptive Statistics
  • Modifying Data-Domaining, Top cutting and Compositing
  • Spatial Relationships and Variography
  • Estimation Methodologies (Nearest Neighbour, Inverse Distance and Linear Regression-Kriging)
  • Choosing Estimation Parameters-block sizes and search neighbourhoods
  • Estimation
  • Validation
  • Classification
  • Documentation
  • Workflows for various commercial software or GSLIB.
Course Details
CourseDates 
Resources and Reserve Reporting for Private Companies18-20/11/19Enquire Now

For private exploration and mining companies, there is no legal requirement for the generation of an annual Mineral Resource and Ore Reserve Report, adhering to JORC Code, NI 43-101, SAMREC or other standards.  However, there may be internal procedures and requirements to be met for private companies, including  for stakeholders, joint venture partners or financial institutions, and the type of report generated for these situations may be best served using the recognised reporting format.

This course is intended to help the technical specialists involved in the reporting of Mineral Resources and Ore Reserves for private companies, in order to produce an appropriate report on the status of a project, company development, or mining operation and how to comment on the quality of technical information and risk factors.

Using the regulations (JORC Code, NI 43-101, SAMREC) as a guide, delegates are taken through the process of generating a report on Mineral Resources and Ore/Mineral Reserves.  It includes exercises in reviewing and writing portions of a report as well as guidelines on personal responsibility and professional ethics.

Course Content

  • History and Principles of Public Reporting of Mineral Resources and Ore/Mineral Reserves.
  • Responsible Person’s competency and responsibilities.
  • Structure of the most commonly used reporting codes (JORC Code, NI 43-101, SAMREC or other CRIRSCO aligned codes).
  • Structure of technical reports.
  • Technical Reports, Press Releases, Websites and other forms of Public Reporting.
  • Reporting of Mineral Resources.
  • Reporting of Mineral Resources and Ore/Mineral Reserves.
  • Updates of technical reports/press releases and follow-on (additional Studies) reports.
  • JORC Code Table 1 criteria
  • Formatting of Figures.
  • Writing Styles and Terminology
Course Details
CourseDates 
Fundamentals of Pit Optimisation and Mine Planning
and Contracts Management
11-15/11/19Enquire Now

Optimisation commences with the identification of key value drivers and risks based on the available project or operations data such as geological data, geotechnical data, metallurgical test-work data, drill and blast requirements to meet process requirements, logistics and potential constraints.  The key challenge is to simultaneously optimise elements of the value chain rather than to optimise component parts in isolation from the remainder of the elements.  Mine to mill optimisation is therefore based on building an integrated geological, mining and processing model that allows optimization of variables along the value chain.

The two-day Optimisation course focuses on the optimisation levers available to mine planners and operations management to enhance the base plan. The workshop will also assist management and shareholders who are not mining and mineral processing technical experts to be able to assess if optimal mineral asset shareholder value has been considered.

Mine planners ensure value maximisation through decisions on mine design, scheduling alternatives, ore definition, ore access, equipment selection, and ore and waste removal sequences and continually apply forward-looking exercises based on the updated geological model and modifying factors.

This part of the course is designed to assist mine managers, planners, production engineers and other mineral industry professionals to have a better understanding of open pit mine planning and design processes. The course covers the key elements of mine planning premised on mineral resource to mineral reserve conversion process.

Following the above, the optimisation section of the course is designed to inform and inspire business leaders, mine managers, mine planners and mineral asset advisers about the use of the latest optimization concepts and strategies. Optimisation techniques can be used to enhance the value of the business by maximizing value associated with the flow of ore through the different elements of the value chain.

The last part of this course provides delegates with the fundamentals behind compiling and managing mining contracts, with focus on; different contract types and their structure; the tendering process; the principles of contract negotiation; management and dispute resolution.

Course Details
CourseDates 
Fundamentals of Underground Mine Planning, Optimisation,
and Compliance to Plan Tools
18-22/11/19Enquire Now

Mine planners ensure value maximization through decisions on mining method, mine design, scheduling alternatives, ore definition, ore access, equipment selection, and ore and waste removal sequences and the continual application of forward-looking exercises based on the updated geological model and modifying factors.

Using practical exercises, this course is designed to assist mine managers and planners, production engineers and other mineral industry professionals gain a better understanding of underground mine planning, design processes and optimization, and the value of implementing robust production controls to ensure compliance to plan. The course covers the key elements of mine planning and optimization and the importance of implementing strict and robust production controls to ensure compliance to plan.  It also includes a section on the fundamentals of mineral resource to mineral reserve conversion process.

The optimization section of the course is designed to inform and educate business managers, mine managers, mine planners and mineral asset advisers about the use of the latest optimization tools and strategies available in the industry. Such optimization tools, utilizing operational research techniques, have been developed to enhance the value of any business by maximizing value associated with the flow of ore through the different elements of the value chain, whilst minimizing costs.

Optimization commences with the identification of key value drivers, bottle necks and risks based on a specific project or operations data such as geological data, geotechnical data, metallurgical test-work data, drill and blast requirements to meet process requirements, logistics and potential constraints. The key challenge is to simultaneously optimize elements of the value chain rather than to optimize component parts in isolation from the remainder of the elements. Mine to mill optimization is therefore based on building an integrated geological, mining and processing mathematical model that will allow optimization of key variables along the value chain. The two-day Mine-to-Mill Optimization course focuses on the optimization tools available to mine planners and operations management to enhance the base plan.

The optimization part of the course, which is offered as a separate component, will also assist management and shareholders who are not mining and mineral processing technical experts to be able to assess if optimal mineral asset shareholder value has been considered.

The final component of this course provides delegates with the key fundamentals to develop and implement robust production “compliance to plan” tools to assist supervisors and management analyse and implement corrective measures pro-actively. This includes a detailed breakdown of the Life of Mine Plan into various time frames and windows to assist with identify all mining activities impacting the plan.

 

Course Details
CourseDates 
Optimal Open Pit Blasting Techniques
Metal, Coal and Quarry Operations
11-13/11/19 (Met)Enquire Now

This course introduces mine personnel involved in the blasting process to the latest techniques and methods.  The course will focus on Blast Optimisation thereby ensuring downstream benefits through improved drilling and blasting operations.  The course focuses on the generic details of blasting products with no particular emphasis on specific manufacturers and their products, thereby ensuring impartiality.

Opportunities will be given for delegates to introduce the course attendees to their individual technical challenges at their mine site for discussion, with a collective review of their existing blasting techniques and procedures part of the course.

The course will cover the following:

Understanding the basics

  • Understanding your Current designs
  • Major factors influencing blast efficiency
  • Rock fragmentation by blasting
  • Three keys to improving explosive performance
  • Geological effects on blast performance
  • Defining blast performance goals and developing designs
  • Selecting the best explosive for site conditions
  • Initiation Systems
  • Drilling your Blastholes
  • Geological Considerations
  • Fragmentation Optimization
  • Vibration Control
  • AirBlast from Blasting Operations

Slope Stability

Assessing the Outcomes

  • Measuring and Optimising fragmentation
  • Implementing field procedures to achieve consistent blast performance
  • Quantifying blast performance with key performance indicators
  • Defining the downstream effects of blast performance
  • Refining the blast designs to achieve the lowest overall cost

Course Details
CourseDates 
Mining Geology and Mining Practices 10112-13/8/19Enquire Now

There are many people involved or associated with the mining industry who have not worked on a mine site and do not necessarily understand the mining processes.  This two-day course highlights the underlying geology that provides mineral wealth to be exploited and is followed by an insight into the different facets of mining needed to make a viable ore deposit a success.

Delegates will leave the course with a better understanding of mining.

You will be provided with:

  • An introduction to the main rock types (igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary)
  • How the structure of the earth provides us with the minerals we mine
  • The identification of iron ore, gold, nickel, base metals and bauxite deposits and more
  • An overview of the formation of coal, oil and gas deposits
  • An overview of drilling and sample methods
  • Undertake a sampling exercise and identify sampling errors
  • The application of resource estimation to quantify a mineral deposit

The Mining session provides delegates with an overview of the mining cycle for open pit and underground mines, from feasibility studies to mine closure.  The iterative planning process is discussed, and delegates will be able to see that a mine continually plans and plans.

Audio Visual aids provide visualisation of the mining process, incorporating open-pit and various underground mining operations.

You will learn about:

  • The life of a mine from exploration through to mine closure
  • Open Pit and Underground mining
  • Pre-feasibility and feasibility studies
  • Mine planning; optimisation, scheduling, cut-off grades
  • Mine Planning activities
  • Capital and Operating Costs
  • Mine closure and rehabilitation
Course Details
CourseDates 
Energy Management13-15/11/19Enquire Now

Effective energy management requires a comprehensive understanding of technical, economic and regulatory aspects. Through planning and the operational awareness of energy-related activities and production processes, the formulation of an energy management practices can result in resource conservation, energy cost savings and the organisational contribution to environmental protection and climate action.

This three-day course presents the dimensions of energy management and its relevance to mining, manufacturing and industrial activities. A comprehensive and active energy management system targets known and revealed challenges, and sets the pathways for ratified energy policies, continuous improvement and realistic and achievable goals and.

The basics and lessons learnt in energy recommendations for utilities (power, water, gas), lighting basics and illumination system improvements, electric motors, operational and production scheduling, maintenance programs and project commissioning will be discussed through qualitative and quantitative examples.

Ideally, delegates attending this course with have an elementary understanding of technical terminology and energy principles with a minimum of one year of relevant work experience.  A basic to intermediate level spreadsheet skills using MS Excel is recommended.

Course Content

  • Life cycle costing of energy supply, demand and consumption
    • When, where and how is energy utilised
  • Understanding energy costs for energy purchasing, accounting and benchmarking
    • Energy and electricity rate structures
  • Electrical systems and electric energy management
  • Economic analysis and life cycle costing
  • Conducting an energy audit based on Energy Management Systems (ISO 50001), associated energy codes, standards and protocols
  • Compiling compliant audit reports
  • Introduction into industrial and commercial energy for multiple activities
    • Lighting basics and lighting system improvements
    • Electric motors and industrial systems
    • Thermal energy storage
    • Boilers and thermal systems improvement
    • Waste heat, co-generation, CHP systems
    • Renewable energy sources
    • Maintenance programs and building commissioning
    • Building automation and control systems
    • M&V and alternative financing
    • Green buildings and LEED
  • Framing an effective staff awareness campaign

 

Course Details
CourseDates 
Carbon Footprint Analysis and
Organisational GHG Accounting
18-19/11/19Enquire Now

Industries and companies are realising the need to evaluate business risks and strategies for a low carbon future. By assessing their energy consumption, they are able to review their impact on the environment and on climate change.

This two-day course teaches organisational GHG accounting in accordance with the Greenhouse Gas Protocol and the ISO 14064 standard. This standard provides the requirements and guidance for companies and other organizations to quantify and publicly report an inventory of GHG emissions and removals associated with a products and activities.

The Carbon Accounting Methodology and practical exercises are explained and practiced. The compilation of the carbon inventory methods are discussed with the perspective of public reporting and social costs. The course also provides an overview of the different types of Carbon Markets (mandatory and voluntary) and the Trading Mechanisms (command-and-control and market approaches).

The latest available information on (specified) country and the global contribution to carbon emissions and the national and international policies and frameworks for carbon taxation, based on carbon emission targets are presented.

Ideally, delegates attending this course with have an elementary understanding of technical terminology with a minimum of one year of relevant work experience.  A basic to intermediate level spreadsheet skills using MS Excel is recommended.

Course Content

  • Understanding the concepts and reasons for organisational GHG accounting
    • Greenhouse Gas effect and climate change
    • Greenhouse Gas Protocol and the ISO 14064 standard
    • Greenhouse gases and emissions sources
    • Steps for a Carbon Footprint Assessment
  • Classifying emissions sources
  • Data collection and tools to overcome information shortfalls
  • Setting a baseline and boundaries
  • GHG calculations
  • Data assessment and data quality control
  • Importance of validation and verification
  • Compiling a compliant report for disclosure
  • Develop and conduct a practical Carbon Footprint Assessment for an organisation
  • Carbon monitoring, reductions and offsetting
  • Sell the carbon footprint to your management or customer
  • Understanding the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)
  • Unpacking the categories of carbon instruments
  • Identifying carbon markets and what is involved for carbon trading

 

Course Details
CourseDates 
Environmental Economics21-22/11/19Enquire Now

Environmental economics is the study of environmental consumption, wastage and depletion through economics. In this discipline, the value of natural resources, and typical techno-economic concerns, such as market failure, externality, or valuation, are applied to environmental topics.

Exploiting natural resources is a necessary part of life and needed for growth and the advancement of society. Therefore, topics such as the balance between the least amount of usage and the greatest societal benefit are studied.  Environmental economists combine the two fields, encouraging economic and societal advancement without forgetting the effect they may be having on the environment.  In just two days, you will receive an exposure to the economics of the environment as a sub-discipline of economics focusing on the inter-relationships between the environment and the economy.

Basic concepts in economic theory are first introduced, and this is progressed to property rights and how markets behave and the failure to achieve economically efficient allocations thus resulting in environmental pollution and degradation.  The approaches that are available for environmental valuation are explored. An example is presented on the integration of environmental economics into a typical mining or industrial projects.

Environmental policy making and the concept of sustainable development are examined through the instruments of environmental policy, from command-and-control methods to economic or incentive-based mechanisms.  The fundamental link and quantitative balance of these resource extremes, namely mineral and environmental, is presented based on the circular flow model, and through case studies of market failures and full/social costs of transactions (private costs and external/environmental costs).

The theory and practise of the benefit-cost analysis is presented based on a typical mining project, from demand and willingness-to-pay perspectives, damage and abatement costing, and economic efficiency for mining activity problems.

Ideally, delegates should have an elementary understanding of technical terminology and energy and economic principles together with a minimum of one year of relevant work experience. A basic to intermediate level spreadsheet skills using MS Excel is recommended.

You will learn:

  • e Basics of Economics
  • Economy of the Environment and Sustainability
    • Effective governance
  • Environmental economics techniques
    • Environmental economics fundamentals
    • Valuation (project appraisal)
    • Market failure
    • Value of risks to environment
  • Corporate environment economics
    • Environmentally extended input-output analysis
    • Business case for environment economics
    • Policy instruments
  • Environmental policy and resource use
  • Trade and international environmental issues
  • International environmental problems

What will delegates achieve with this course?

Our training imparts multiple skills for participants to integrate environmental economics into mineral economics and mining projects with confidence and to:

  • Understand the concept of energy economics by engineers, managers, and staff in procurement, facilities management, finance, CSR and sustainability
  • Value companies from juniors to major corporations from an environmental perspective that is incorporated into mineral economics
  • Determine the correct environmental valuation approach to provide a techno-financial perspective of the company and/or projects
    • Recognise best practice and correct application of environmental valuation methods
    • Understanding the key risk factors, mitigation and adaptation, and mainstreaming
  • Analyse environmental valuation techniques and reporting
    • Overview of the value of project studies including environmental economics, independent technical reports and due diligence
  • Review environmental valuations presented in the public domain
    • Increasing efficiency to make decisions on investment opportunities
    • Reasons why investors invest capital in mining industry when environmental economics are considered

Course Details
CourseDates 
Mine Stormwater Management Plan Best Practice11-14/11/19Enquire Now

This 4-day course has been especially designed for people working at mining operations or planning development of future mining projects, who are involved in the management of stormwater at a mine (Operational or Planned).

You will learn about the key activities for preparation of a Stormwater Management Plan (SWMP), implementing it and maintaining it, complete with tracking its performance progress.

This course addresses:

  • Erosion Control vs. Sediment Control when developing a SWMP, such as:
  • The Elements Required in a SWMP?
  • SWMP Roles and Responsibilities:
  • SWMP Objectives:
  • How to Assess and Evaluate Your Site and Proposed Project:
  • Developing Site and Location Maps:
  • Keys to Effective Erosion and Sediment Control:
  • Key Pollution Prevention Principles for Good Housekeeping. How to:
  • Describing Your Plans and Procedures for Inspecting BMPs:
  • BMP Maintenance:

In Summary, the course will provide insight into:

  • Developing a SWMP
  • Training Your Staff and Subcontractors;
  • Ensuring Responsibility—Contractor and Subcontractor Agreements;
  • Implementing Your SWMP Before Construction Starts;
  • Conducting Inspections and Maintaining BMPs;
  • Updating and Evaluating Your SWMP;
  • Implementation of Final surface cover Stabilization;
  • Activities leading up to Permit Termination;
  • Procedures for Record Retention.

Course Details
CourseDates 
Professional Microsoft Excel Skills18-21/11/19Enquire Now

Many mine and other professionals use Microsoft Excel daily.  In most cases these professionals have had limited training and, as a result, create spreadsheets that are potentially excessively manual, user-unfriendly, cumbersome to maintain and, more importantly, error prone.

This thee-day master course is targeted at professionals who create/develop Excel spreadsheets used by themselves or their colleagues on a routine basis.  This course provides insights into how Excel can be used in a logical, structured, automated and user-friendly manner, to create spreadsheets that are, automated, user-friendly and error-free.

The course is loosely divided into 3 levels, namely; Fundamental, Intermediate and Professional

The approach of the course is largely from a ‘system modelling perspective’ where a system is a collection of models or processes.  Hence there is some preliminary discussion on modelling frameworks.

These modelling frameworks can be represented via:

◦ Diagrams (flowsheets)

◦ Descriptions (documents)

◦ Mathematics  (equations) and

◦ Calculations (Excel formulae)

Most users of Excel focus on using Excel as a collation of equations which, when lacking visualisation, documentation and structure, creates ‘messy’ spreadsheets.  By following a more systemic approach the application of Excel becomes logical, user-friendly and automated.

Course content:

Fundamentals Phase

Participants will be required to take an unstructured, unformatted spreadsheet and convert it into a useful system.

Intermediate Phase:This phase of the course will largely focus on Visual Basics for Applications (VBA).  VBA is a computer language available in Excel (although not well-known by users).  VBA facilitates automation allowing repetitive tasks (formatting, applying formulae) to be automated.

The intermediate course will also focus on data handling and workbook management

Intermediate Phase:

This phase of the course will largely focus on Visual Basics for Applications (VBA).  VBA is a computer language available in Excel (although not well-known by users).  VBA facilitates automation allowing repetitive tasks (formatting, applying formulae) to be automated.

The intermediate course will also focus on data handling and workbook management

Professional Phase:

In this phase, many of the concepts taught into the previous two days will be used as the basis for creating professional workbooks.  However here focus is given to flowsheets, which for many engineers are used as a method of process understanding, but here is used for data-process modelling.

Flow-sheeting is therefore a skill that is straightforward for engineers and scientists to master; and serves as an introduction to data analytics.

Course Details
CourseDates 
Professional Presentation Skills18-21/11/19Enquire Now

[[Having to speak to or make a visual presentation to a group can be a stressful experience.

This program explores the skills required to create and deliver highly effective presentations with confidence and style.

It also includes how to use visual aids to achieve optimal impact.

The learning environment is comfortable, safe and fun with many opportunities to practice.

Who Will Benefit?

Anyone responsible for presenting to peers, staff or clients and those seeking to acquire professional presentation skills.

Program Content

  • What makes a successful presentation?
  • Knowing the audience and its needs
  • Presentation intent and purpose
  • Preparation and planning
  • Presentation design
  • Using aids effectively
  • Building confidence and ease
  • Delivery techniques
  • Presentation review
  • Handling questions
  • Enliven your presentations

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants should be able to:
  • Plan, prepare and deliver an effective presentation
  • Demonstrate effective presentation and communication skills
  • Speak clearly and confidently in both prepared and impromptu speaking situations
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the presentation

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